Monday, 17 May 2010

the wood for the trees

Smitonius:

Continuing on the tree theme, but in a different location. I live in a bungalow in North London with an unusually large garden for the area. We have 4 large trees, one of which is near a boundary wall. On Saturday we received a letter from our neighbour's insurers, and - sadly - one of our trees has got to be felled down completely. Apparently, it is the cause of subsidence. A Robinia, covered in Ivy and host to much wildlife - see how large the tree is?:

On a more cheerful, and also woody theme, we had bookshelves fitted in the hallway this week. After years of hosting books on the floor, they now line our walls:


Fancy a close up? That way you get to see which books we have been reading....


What have you been reading lately? I have just finished reading Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil. Which I did enjoy, mainly because we had visited Savannah. And the other book on the go in the household is: The Moonflower Vine, which is being loved.

Adenda:
Loving the support - re: the tree. In fact, this neighbour has done things by the book, and the report is not simply from the insurers but also from tree specialists contracted in by insurers. And they will pay. At one point last year, when the problem was pointed out by another neighbour (who expected us to pay for the tree to be cut down ourselves, out of the goodness of our hearts and with no report), we refused - though we did pay to have her trimmed a little. Sadly, the tree has been living on borrowed time. But we will press for tree contractors that we respect, and the correct time for the work to be done for fledglings and other nesting creatures.

10 comments:

rachel said...

OMG, this blog is turning into a horror story involving tree-killing! I'd hold out on any felling till you're sure nesting time is over - I'm sure you've thought of that - and also ask some very detailed questions about the survey that produced the death sentence. Insurance companies can be terribly cavalier in such matters, and not always right either. Sorry I'm being such a busybody, but it's so sad to see well-established trees come down. Maybe you need to issue warnings like they do on the telly: 'this item may upset some easily-outraged people'....

jinksy said...

I think your book shelves have just turned me green with envy...though the tree felling made me a bit red first with indignation, tinged with blue for sadness - now I look like a paintbox...

Tania said...

I'm with Rachel every step of her comment. Plus the neighbours should have to pay for the conversion of the Robinia in to yet more lovely line-the-wall bookshelves.

Tattie Weasle said...

Yes do try to get them to hold off for a few more weeks and it's always worth double checking but obviously not at the expense of being a good neighbour nothing is worse that a neighbourly spat!

Pam said...

Try to go out at the time when it's cut down. I had a similar experience. Don't know what's worse, the sound of a healthy tree being cut down or the space it leaves when it's done.I hope they at least do it when nesting is finished.

Marcheline said...

We lost a pair of intertwined trees we named "the lovers" a few years back, and I can tell you it's a long road to recovery (heartwise). We've planted a rowan tree in the midst of the remaining, trunk, and the sight of that wee life striving towards the sun is brightening the spot immensely.

Have you read "eat pray love" yet? You might like it!

Vicki Lane said...

This is so sad about the tree and the other trees!

I always like to look at other peoples book shelves -- one gets a sense of who they are.

mountainear said...

Losing a mature tree is always such a sad thing, but like everything else they have their allotted span and there is a time to say goodbye. I truly hope that all parties are as well meaning as they seem to be at present and that the tree's inhabitants get a chance to leave

See it as an opportunity to plant another - which will give you pleasure in seeing it grow as well as planting for the future.

Great bookshelves - always interesting to see what others read!

Mac n' Janet said...

Glad you liked Midnight in the Garden, we live near Savannah and the book was a good representation of the city. Have you seen the movie?

Mitzi Curi said...

I'm enjoying reading your blog for the first time, thanks for visiting mine. Keep in touch, friend!

Mitzi